Out of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille by Russell Freedman (1997)

Can I just say, bless those authors who write excellent biographies for children!

darkness.jpgLouis Braille was born in 1809 in a small town outside of Paris, France.  Through a terrible accident involving his father’s leather working tools, Louis was blinded at age three.  Despite this overwhelming disability, Louis pursues his education and at age ten begins attending the Royal Institute for Blind Youth in Paris — one of the first such schools in the world.

Discouraged by the limited books available for the blind, due to the cumbersome method of writing (large raised letters — making for massive, heavy books), Louis began inventing his own touch alphabet system in his early teens.  He borrowed a system used by the French Army that allowed soldiers to “read” military orders in the dark by touching raised dots and dashes on thick paper.  Louis greatly improved on their system and eventually invented what is known today as Braille.

Sometimes it seems like solutions to complex problems of the past were inevitable, but when you read the biographies of those who actually solve these difficult problems, you come to understand that is not true.  Observation, inspiration, trial and error, hard work, and often a bit of luck are usually the hallmark of those who change the world.  All of these were true for Louis Braille.  You and your children will be inspired by Out of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille!

Middle Grade Reading Level, 96 pages, Books for Boys, Published in 1997.

 

 

About kidsbooksworthreading

Are you looking for Children’s and Young Adult books that have stood the test of time? I have a master of list of over 600 titles to share. I’m an English major, mother of five and homeschooler for 15 years. My purpose with this blog is to share forgotten favorites that most parents today have never heard of, but are so worth reading! I hope you’ll join with me as I share the best that Youth Literature has to offer.
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