The Most Wonderful Doll in the World by Phyllis McGinley (1950)

Dulcy is a little girl who loves dolls and owns LOTS of them:  big, small, blond, brunette, fancy and plain.  But Dulcy is never content with what she has, in fact, she’s always wishing her dolls were different or better in one way or another.

doll.jpg

Then one day, an elderly neighbor gives her a special doll named Angela that used to belong to the neighbor’s daughter.  Dulcy is delighted with Angela, but immediately begins thinking of how much better of a doll Angela would be if she were just a little more . . .

And then Angela is lost.

Suddenly the lost doll is remembered far better than she actually was in real life.  The tales of Angela’s beauty and abilities grow more fantastic as time goes on.

And then Angela is found.

You’ll enjoy Dulcy’s vivid descriptions and what happens when imagination and reality meet.  This is a sweet read-aloud for young children or a short read-alone book for a 2nd or 3rd grader.

Two fun facts:  The Most Wonderful Doll in the World was named a Caldecott Honor Book for the darling illustrations by Helen Stone.  And in 1960, the author, Phyllis McGinley, was the first writer to ever to win the Pulitzer Prize — for a collection of her poems called Times Three: Selected Verse from Three Decades with Seventy New Poems.  In case you wanted to look them up!

Early Reading Level, 61 pages, Imagination, Caldecott Honor Book, Published in 1950.

 

About kidsbooksworthreading

Are you looking for Children’s and Young Adult books that have stood the test of time? I have a master of list of over 600 titles to share. I’m an English major, mother of five and homeschooler for 15 years. My purpose with this blog is to share forgotten favorites that most parents today have never heard of, but are so worth reading! I hope you’ll join with me as I share the best that Youth Literature has to offer.
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